Karen Coe

Why a homestay?

Staying as a guest in someone’s home has a very different feel to staying in a lodge, hotel or even a B&B. A night in a private home is a fascinating way to see at first-hand what life is like when you step out of the travel environment and into the daily life of the people in the destination you have travelled to. For many it forms one of the most memorable parts of their holiday.

“Our hostess was very welcoming and smiley.”

As a homestay guest you will eat the food your host prepares for you, cooked in their home kitchen and consumed with their family. You spend the night in a room in a ‘normal’ village or city home and neighbourhood and your host family will do all they can to make you feel at home. There is plenty of time to talk to your hosts, to learn about their way of life and their homeland, gain a new perspective on the destination you are visiting and maybe pick up the kind of insider knowledge you wouldn’t find in a guidebook.

Most homestay hosts love to meet new people so are very welcoming, and you also have the satisfaction of knowing that you have directly benefited the local community.

Amantani Island homestay, Peru

The pre-Inca Aymara people of Amantani island on Lake Titicaca, Peru, welcome guests and their guides for overnight stays with local families. The island is between four and five hours by boat from Puno and a stay here is usually preceded by a visit to the floating reed islands of Uros, with a trip to Taquile island the following day. Guests are assigned their host family on arrival on Amantani, with the islanders taking it in turn to host visitors.

As a guest in an Amantani island homestay you are likely to have the best bedroom in the house or outbuilding, though it is likely still to be fairly basic by western standards, possibly with limited or no electricity. Remember, you are living as the islanders do.  You’ll enjoy wholesome, simple local meals and may well be invited to the village meeting place for a dance afterwards.

Just as you would do if you were a guest in someone’s house in your home country, it is nice if you take a small gift for your hosts, perhaps vegetables, fruit or bread or candles.

Tribes’ guest feedback includes comments such as ‘Our hostess was very welcoming and smiley and produced tasty food from her stock-pot over an open fire and a gas cooker’, and ‘Walter and Vilma and their children welcomed us with open arms and treated us like friends, the food and level of service was wonderful.’

 

Indian homestays 

Hospitality is one of the most valued traditions of Indian culture, with guests in Indian homes being seem as representatives of God. Tribes’ directors Amanda and Guy Marks recently stayed at Rosie’s Homestay in Meghalaya in north east India. This is larger than the usual homestay, with four guest bedrooms and Rosie is an excellent cook who is happy to give cookery lessons to her guests, who can also watch local craftspeople at work.

 

Hospitality is one of the most valued traditions of Indian culture, with guests in Indian homes being seem as representatives of God.

Amanda said “Rosie is a lovely Khasi lady with plenty of oomph! And she is a great cook too; we had a superbly tasty pork dinner. Her 4 bedrooms are clean and have the basic necessities. Ask her to take you for a walk around her little lake and grounds if you come, and maybe even ask for a cooking lesson. A stay here is not about luxury, it’s about seeing a bit of (middle-class) Khasi life.

Homestays aren’t restricted to villages; travellers to Dehli can enjoy daily family life in an affluent residential suburb of the city with a stay at Aashiyan Homestay, a contemporary house where hosts Kiran and JP Singh  go out of their way to make guests feel at home. And, for a peaceful night just 4km from Mysore city, the spacious and elegant Gitanjali Homestay in the Chamundi Hills provides relaxing air-conditioned comfort and Kodava cuisine.  Cookery classes can be arranged, as can yoga sessions and Ayurveda treatments.

So, if you’d like to live like a local for a night or two on your holiday, let us know!

Karen Coe

Karen Coe

When she's not writing about things Tribes Travel-related Karen is writing about her other great love - historic motorsport. She's also exceptionally fond of dogs, including Tribes' resident canine Finn, though she doesn't usually write about them.