Into the wild

From pangolins to fossas, and shoebill storks to red pandas, we know where and when to send you to give you the very best chance of seeing these incredible species. 

Our colourful new brochure ‘The World’s Top Wildlife Experiences’ brings together some of the incredible wildlife experiences that we are delighted to organise for our clients. Here is just a snapshot of some of the content – plus details of how to acquire your own copy to peruse at your leisure…

Wallow and yawn – the hippo pool

I watched as a lone hippo tried to muscle in on the pool. Hippos are territorial, and dangerously aggressive with it, but Katavi National Park hippo pool attracts hundreds of hippos which come to wallow cheek-by-jowl in the springfed mud. There was a gloopy ripple in the pool as the other muddy bodies grudgingly gave way for another incomer.

This behaviour is unusual. Far more likely is that you will see them in pods in rivers or lakes. South Luangwa is a fantastic place for hippos. You’ll see them wherever you stay here, but hippo-lovers should especially consider Kaingo or Mwamba camps for access to their hippo hide. And of course, most keen photographers are waiting for the hippo shot: the yawn.

 

“On the prowl…”

  • Cheetahs © Shutterstock -Stephanie Periquet
  • Chilean Puma © Shutterstock – Joe McDonald

On the prowl with the cats of Africa…
You might be in the Masai Mara or Serengeti witnessing big cats taking advantage of the wealth of the wildebeest migration. You could be here when three cheetah brothers race off their viewing mound towards a herd of impalas, or when your guide spots two tiny leopard cubs on a rock in Zambia’s South Luangwa. Being in the bush with Africa’s top big cat predators is exhilarating and touching in equal measure, and a joy that, once experienced, must be repeated!

Meeting the Latin American cats
Jungle cat and mountain lion –  big cats that have been persecuted for generations due to their conflict with domestic livestock. But in places without livestock, such as riverbanks and remote areas, they have posed little threat to the livelihoods of fishermen and the likes. As man’s focus has recently changed to think more about conservation, these big cats have had something of a renaissance. Some are even habituated or at least comfortable enough not to run away from humans.

As a result, if you know where to go – and we do – we can take you to places where you will almost certainly get great sightings of these magnificent jaguars and pumas.

In search of big cats in India
Searching for tigers and leopards (let alone the vastly more rare snow leopard) is not easy, but when you see these incredible big cats, I promise your heart will sing. They are mesmerising.

There are under 4,000 tigers left in the wild, most of these are Bengal tigers found in India. There is thought to be a similarly low number of snow leopards, and though the Indian leopard is more numerous it is still at great risk. Come and see them.

 

Pura Vida in Costa Rica

Osa Peninsula is treasure trove for nature and wildlife lovers. It is home to at least half of the species living in Costa Rica – about 140 mammal species and over 400 bird species – many of these living in Corcovado National Park within the peninsula. Much of Costa Rica teems with wildlife, but if you are a true enthusiast and want the very best wildlife experience in the country, Osa is the place to come. National Geographic called it: “the most biologically intense place on earth.”

Osa’s 700 square miles is almost entirely covered in rainforest (with about 700 tree species) reaching right down to the Pacific coast. It’s rare to find anywhere on the planet now where rainforest meets the sea. You come for this incredibly rich forest habitat, but you can also enjoy the coast, see whales in the Golfo Dulce, and go snorkelling at Cano Island.

 

 

  • Resplendent quetzal: © Shutterstock – Ondrej Prosicky
  • Whale breaching: © Shutterstock – nuriajudit

“Two million animals on the move…”

Witnessing the Great Migration
It’s hard to get your mind around 2 million animals on the move. The world’s largest mass land migration is just this though. Vast swathes of wildebeest, as well as huge numbers of zebras, plus Thompson’s gazelle and eland make the arduous journey from the Serengeti to the Masai Mara and back again. They constantly follow the fresh grazing afforded by the rains. This circle of life includes birth, joyous moments of youngsters learning to play and love life, heart-in-mouth river crossings, dramatic narrow escapes from predators, and sadly, death. It’s raw, it can be emotional, it’s an incredible sight.

 

  • Migration: © Shutterstock – Jurgen Vogt
  • Lion: © Shutterstock – nwdph

“We are all nature lovers and we travel for the joy of what each new adventure might bring.”

© Shutterstock – Longjourney

Step into the wild with Tribes

Wildlife-loving world travellers are always planning the next trip and considering what they’d like to see next. Here at Tribes, we’re no different. We are all nature lovers and we travel for the joy of what each new adventure might bring. Since travel is not just a job for us but also a passion (especially when it’s linked to conservation and species and habitat protection), we love talking to people who are equally besotted by the world and its wildlife.

Tell us what you want to find next. The chances are that we might already know, but if we don’t, we will find out for you and hopefully find a way to get you there.

If you’d like your own copy of ‘The World’s Top Wildlife Experiences’, you can download a digital copy here or, if you’re based in the UK, contact us and we’ll post one out to you. Or pick up a hard copy at one of the shows Tribes is attending this year:

 

Karen Coe

When she's not writing about things Tribes Travel-related Karen is writing about her other great love - historic motorsport. She's also exceptionally fond of dogs, including Tribes' resident canine Finn, though she doesn't usually write about them.