Into the wild

Into the wild

Into the wild

From pangolins to fossas, and shoebill storks to red pandas, we know where and when to send you to give you the very best chance of seeing these incredible species. 

Our colourful new brochure ‘The World’s Top Wildlife Experiences’ brings together some of the incredible wildlife experiences that we are delighted to organise for our clients. Here is just a snapshot of some of the content – plus details of how to acquire your own copy to peruse at your leisure…

Wallow and yawn – the hippo pool

I watched as a lone hippo tried to muscle in on the pool. Hippos are territorial, and dangerously aggressive with it, but Katavi National Park hippo pool attracts hundreds of hippos which come to wallow cheek-by-jowl in the springfed mud. There was a gloopy ripple in the pool as the other muddy bodies grudgingly gave way for another incomer.

This behaviour is unusual. Far more likely is that you will see them in pods in rivers or lakes. South Luangwa is a fantastic place for hippos. You’ll see them wherever you stay here, but hippo-lovers should especially consider Kaingo or Mwamba camps for access to their hippo hide. And of course, most keen photographers are waiting for the hippo shot: the yawn.

 

“On the prowl…”

  • Cheetahs © Shutterstock -Stephanie Periquet
  • Chilean Puma © Shutterstock – Joe McDonald

On the prowl with the cats of Africa…
You might be in the Masai Mara or Serengeti witnessing big cats taking advantage of the wealth of the wildebeest migration. You could be here when three cheetah brothers race off their viewing mound towards a herd of impalas, or when your guide spots two tiny leopard cubs on a rock in Zambia’s South Luangwa. Being in the bush with Africa’s top big cat predators is exhilarating and touching in equal measure, and a joy that, once experienced, must be repeated!

Meeting the Latin American cats
Jungle cat and mountain lion –  big cats that have been persecuted for generations due to their conflict with domestic livestock. But in places without livestock, such as riverbanks and remote areas, they have posed little threat to the livelihoods of fishermen and the likes. As man’s focus has recently changed to think more about conservation, these big cats have had something of a renaissance. Some are even habituated or at least comfortable enough not to run away from humans.

As a result, if you know where to go – and we do – we can take you to places where you will almost certainly get great sightings of these magnificent jaguars and pumas.

In search of big cats in India
Searching for tigers and leopards (let alone the vastly more rare snow leopard) is not easy, but when you see these incredible big cats, I promise your heart will sing. They are mesmerising.

There are under 4,000 tigers left in the wild, most of these are Bengal tigers found in India. There is thought to be a similarly low number of snow leopards, and though the Indian leopard is more numerous it is still at great risk. Come and see them.

 

Pura Vida in Costa Rica

Osa Peninsula is treasure trove for nature and wildlife lovers. It is home to at least half of the species living in Costa Rica – about 140 mammal species and over 400 bird species – many of these living in Corcovado National Park within the peninsula. Much of Costa Rica teems with wildlife, but if you are a true enthusiast and want the very best wildlife experience in the country, Osa is the place to come. National Geographic called it: “the most biologically intense place on earth.”

Osa’s 700 square miles is almost entirely covered in rainforest (with about 700 tree species) reaching right down to the Pacific coast. It’s rare to find anywhere on the planet now where rainforest meets the sea. You come for this incredibly rich forest habitat, but you can also enjoy the coast, see whales in the Golfo Dulce, and go snorkelling at Cano Island.

 

 

  • Resplendent quetzal: © Shutterstock – Ondrej Prosicky
  • Whale breaching: © Shutterstock – nuriajudit

“Two million animals on the move…”

Witnessing the Great Migration
It’s hard to get your mind around 2 million animals on the move. The world’s largest mass land migration is just this though. Vast swathes of wildebeest, as well as huge numbers of zebras, plus Thompson’s gazelle and eland make the arduous journey from the Serengeti to the Masai Mara and back again. They constantly follow the fresh grazing afforded by the rains. This circle of life includes birth, joyous moments of youngsters learning to play and love life, heart-in-mouth river crossings, dramatic narrow escapes from predators, and sadly, death. It’s raw, it can be emotional, it’s an incredible sight.

 

  • Migration: © Shutterstock – Jurgen Vogt
  • Lion: © Shutterstock – nwdph

“We are all nature lovers and we travel for the joy of what each new adventure might bring.”

© Shutterstock – Longjourney

Step into the wild with Tribes

Wildlife-loving world travellers are always planning the next trip and considering what they’d like to see next. Here at Tribes, we’re no different. We are all nature lovers and we travel for the joy of what each new adventure might bring. Since travel is not just a job for us but also a passion (especially when it’s linked to conservation and species and habitat protection), we love talking to people who are equally besotted by the world and its wildlife.

Tell us what you want to find next. The chances are that we might already know, but if we don’t, we will find out for you and hopefully find a way to get you there.

If you’d like your own copy of ‘The World’s Top Wildlife Experiences’, you can download a digital copy here or, if you’re based in the UK, contact us and we’ll post one out to you. Or pick up a hard copy at one of the shows Tribes is attending this year:

 

On the right tracks

On the right tracks

On the right tracks

Header image © The Blue Train

Side image © Imvelo Safari Lodges

There can be a romance in rail travel in foreign countries that’s hard to find in the 11.05am from Ipswich to Liverpool Street. From luxury trains crossing South Africa, Peru or India to  switchbacking up and down an almost sheer cliff face in Ecuador, there’s something rather special about taking to the tracks on holiday.

Image © Belmond

First class all the way…

Cocooned in elegance, spectacular landscapes viewed through picture windows as an attentive waiter proffers a glass of champagne, a fine afternoon tea or splendid silver-service dinner before you retreat to your peaceful, sumptuous cabin, to be lulled to sleep by the rhythm of the rails… a luxury train journey is a thing of beauty.

Thanks to a certain Agatha Christie book and the subsequent A-list star-packed films, the iconic and exotic train that immediately springs to mind is usually the Orient Express. However, let me present some others for your consideration…

The Belmond Andean Explorer  is owned and operated by the same organisation that runs the Venice-Simplon Orient Express and there are clear echoes of that famous piece of rolling stock to be found in what was the first luxury sleeper train in South America.

“Coccooned in elegance…”

Images © Belmond

One of two distinctive, midnight-blue Belmond trains running in Peru, the Andean Explorer is a glorious way to travel from Cusco to Peru’s famed ‘white city’ Arequipa or Lake Titicaca, stopping at points of interest en-route. You get an amazing view of the glorious scenery from the observation car and can even relax with a massage in the spa car.

The Belmond Hiram Bingham is an unforgettable way to travel in classic style to Machu Picchu. Fantastic, 1920s-style elegance transports you back to a time when polished brass and wood were the norm and Pullman carriages were the only way to travel. Crossing Peru’s Sacred Valley, heading to the iconic ‘lost city of the Incas’ on board this superb train is something that’s definitely on my personal bucket list. They take it slow, so you get to enjoy around three and half hours of refined style and impeccable food, wine and service as you look out onto cloud forest, mountains and valleys and ancient towns and villages.

Belmond never forgets that this is a Peruvian adventure. Enjoy a Pisco sour, take in traditional local music performances on board, and savour fine Peruvian wines and local delicacies with a sophisticated twist.

PeruRail…

PeruRail’s Vistadome train, which travels between Cusco, Ollantaytambo and Machu Picchu, allows you to enjoy contemporary Andean style and elegance. On board you’ll also be treated to a fashion show demonstating the newest trends in alpaca clothing, together with live traditional dance performances. The rail carriages  have vast expanses of glass, wrapping up to the roof, to help you make the most of the panoramic views.

PeruRail’s Titicaca train crosses the Andes between Cusco and Puno and features 1920s-style Pullman carriages and an open-air observation car which is ideal for photographers looking to capture shots of the jaw-dropping landscapes.

 

 

Traverse South Africa in style

In South Africa you have a choice of luxury sleeper trains between Cape Town and Pretoria and vice versa; the Blue Train and Rovos Rail.

The Blue Train has operated since 1946 and the 1,600-mile, two-night journey is unforgettable. Think of it as a five-star hotel on wheels, with a glorious and ever-changing view and the finest of South African wines and haute cuisine. Oh, and your own butler on call.  The Blue Train also travels to Kruger National Park, and I can think of no finer way to arrive on safari.

Equally sumptuous, Rovos Rail is another wood-panelled piece of handsome rolling stock. Before you even step on board, the exclusive Rovos Rail pre-departure lounge at Pretoria station puts you in the frame of mind for the opulence that lies ahead.

 

Main image and top side image © The Blue Train

Bottom side image © Rovos Rail

“Game viewing as the train trundles along.”

Imvelo’s Stimela Star is a private sleeper train running from Victoria Falls to Hwange National Park. It may not hit the luxurious heights of Rovos Rail or the Blue Train, but, with its cheerful and endlessly helpful staff, recently-restored retro accommodation and excellent food, it’s immensely charming and a great addition to your safari holiday without busting the budget. If you’re staying at Imvelo’s Bomani Tented Lodge or Camelthorn you can extend your rail journey on Imvelo’s Elephant Express, an open-sided single railcar that provides game viewing as the train trundles along the tracks to the lodges.

 

Elephant Express and Stimela Star images © Imvelo Safari Lodges

“A fantastic way to travel across a country famed for its rail tradition.”

Palace on Wheels images © Nav Jyoti TV Studio

See India from the Palace on Wheels

How about an eight-day sleeper train ride through Northern India? The Palace on Wheels maintains the longstanding Indian tradition of rail travel, taking in Agra, Bharatpur, Dehli, Chittorgarh Fort, Jaipur Jaisalmer, Jodhpur, Ranthambore National Park, the Taj Mahal and Udaipur en-route. It’s a fantastic way to travel across a country famed for its rail tradition, with guided tours of the famous stopping places.  Of course, there’s a huge choice of rail journeys in India and our consultants often book overnight trains for our travellers; they’re a great way to travel between the game parks of central India for example. These aren’t luxury trains, but are a very convenient way to travel and a fantastic way to see another aspect of day-to-day Indian life.

If you’re a narrow gauge railway fan heading to India, make sure you talk to us about one of the ‘toy trains’, which operate on a number of routes including from Kalka to Shimla or Ooty.

 

All aboard the Ecuador Cruise Train

Here’s something new and a little different – Tren Ecuador is not a sleeper train but a way to see Ecuador at a leisurely pace by rail while stopping at hotels and lodges en route. Two levels of travel are available, Luxury and the upgraded Gold class, with the difference being in the hotels or haciendas you say in on the journey. You’ll travel on the same luxury train, through incredible ever-changing scenery, stopping at fascinating places and meeting local craftsmen and women, visiting markets and enjoying traditional cuisine.

The route includes the dramatic switchbacks along the Devil’s Nose route (see images above and below) – and if your itinerary won’t allow for the full six-day experience, you can board the train just for key sections, including the Devil’s Nose. There’s also the Tren de la Libertad, which crosses bridges over steep canyons and through seven tunnels between Ibarra and Salinas, where its arrival is greeted with the tune ‘La Bomba’.  Salinas is home to the Afro-ecuadorian people, and a visit to this town, with its colourful murals and fascinating museums, is a great way to spend a day.

This is by no means an exhaustive list of the available train journeys so, if you fancy getting on the right tracks on your holiday, don’t forget to ask us about the opportunities for rail travel in your chosen destination!

 

Why a homestay?

Why a homestay?

Why a homestay?

Staying as a guest in someone’s home has a very different feel to staying in a lodge, hotel or even a B&B. A night in a private home is a fascinating way to see at first-hand what life is like when you step out of the travel environment and into the daily life of the people in the destination you have travelled to. For many it forms one of the most memorable parts of their holiday.

“Our hostess was very welcoming and smiley.”

As a homestay guest you will eat the food your host prepares for you, cooked in their home kitchen and consumed with their family. You spend the night in a room in a ‘normal’ village or city home and neighbourhood and your host family will do all they can to make you feel at home. There is plenty of time to talk to your hosts, to learn about their way of life and their homeland, gain a new perspective on the destination you are visiting and maybe pick up the kind of insider knowledge you wouldn’t find in a guidebook.

Most homestay hosts love to meet new people so are very welcoming, and you also have the satisfaction of knowing that you have directly benefited the local community.

Amantani Island homestay, Peru

The pre-Inca Aymara people of Amantani island on Lake Titicaca, Peru, welcome guests and their guides for overnight stays with local families. The island is between four and five hours by boat from Puno and a stay here is usually preceded by a visit to the floating reed islands of Uros, with a trip to Taquile island the following day. Guests are assigned their host family on arrival on Amantani, with the islanders taking it in turn to host visitors.

As a guest in an Amantani island homestay you are likely to have the best bedroom in the house or outbuilding, though it is likely still to be fairly basic by western standards, possibly with limited or no electricity. Remember, you are living as the islanders do.  You’ll enjoy wholesome, simple local meals and may well be invited to the village meeting place for a dance afterwards.

Just as you would do if you were a guest in someone’s house in your home country, it is nice if you take a small gift for your hosts, perhaps vegetables, fruit or bread or candles.

Tribes’ guest feedback includes comments such as ‘Our hostess was very welcoming and smiley and produced tasty food from her stock-pot over an open fire and a gas cooker’, and ‘Walter and Vilma and their children welcomed us with open arms and treated us like friends, the food and level of service was wonderful.’

 

Indian homestays 

Hospitality is one of the most valued traditions of Indian culture, with guests in Indian homes being seem as representatives of God. Tribes’ directors Amanda and Guy Marks recently stayed at Rosie’s Homestay in Meghalaya in north east India. This is larger than the usual homestay, with four guest bedrooms and Rosie is an excellent cook who is happy to give cookery lessons to her guests, who can also watch local craftspeople at work.

 

Hospitality is one of the most valued traditions of Indian culture, with guests in Indian homes being seem as representatives of God.

Amanda said “Rosie is a lovely Khasi lady with plenty of oomph! And she is a great cook too; we had a superbly tasty pork dinner. Her 4 bedrooms are clean and have the basic necessities. Ask her to take you for a walk around her little lake and grounds if you come, and maybe even ask for a cooking lesson. A stay here is not about luxury, it’s about seeing a bit of (middle-class) Khasi life.

Homestays aren’t restricted to villages; travellers to Dehli can enjoy daily family life in an affluent residential suburb of the city with a stay at Aashiyan Homestay, a contemporary house where hosts Kiran and JP Singh  go out of their way to make guests feel at home. And, for a peaceful night just 4km from Mysore city, the spacious and elegant Gitanjali Homestay in the Chamundi Hills provides relaxing air-conditioned comfort and Kodava cuisine.  Cookery classes can be arranged, as can yoga sessions and Ayurveda treatments.

So, if you’d like to live like a local for a night or two on your holiday, let us know!

Travels as a father

Travels as a father

Travels as a father

With Father’s Day this Sunday, June 16, I asked that seasoned traveller, Tribes’ Director Guy Marks, about his experiences of seeing the world through the eyes of his sons…

“You don’t get a second chance to experience something for the first time, but sharing someone else’s experience comes a close second.”

What age were your boys when you started taking them on ‘serious’ holidays, and where was the first destination you took them to?

Or youngest, Luke, was five and our oldest, Dan, was eight when we first took them on safari in Tanzania.

Where else have they travelled to with you?

We’ve been to a few places in Europe and even UK holidays to Cornwall; but the real travelling has been taking them as a family to wonderful long-haul destinations – Nepal, Jordan, South Africa and Costa Rica. And I’ve also taken Dan to Brazil for a trip deep into the Amazon.

As somebody who specialises in helping other people have their own dream holidays, how did it feel to start to see the world through your sons’ eyes? Did it make you look at anywhere, or any experiences, in a different way?

When you have done as much travelling as I have, a lot of things that other people would think were out of the ordinary become pretty normal to me and sometimes go unnoticed. So to see the boys experiencing things for the very first time certainly made me sit back and take another look. You don’t get a second chance to experience something for the first time, but sharing someone else’s experience comes a close second. It was fabulous to watch them see their first lions and elephants, or smile as they tried new exotic foods in Nepal, especially when Dan tried something too hot! And the thrill they got from white-water rafting or from seeing a chameleon change colour in front of their eyes was simply enrapturing.

 

Some people shy away from taking their children on safari, but your boys have been lucky enough to experience a number of trips. What are your best or most exciting memories of taking them on safari?

A five year old has a short attention span even if he is on safari, but I remember how brilliant our driver-guide was in Tanzania, taking Luke on his lap at the wheel of the Land Rover so that he thought he was driving the car himself. 

And at age 7 and 10 they tried their hand a horse-riding whilst on safari in South Africa, only to come face to face with rhino. Most adults don’t even get the opportunity to do that, so to see the two of them get such a magical experience at such a young age and on their first ride was certainly memorable.

Most children love seeing wildlife on safaris and holidays to places like Costa Rica – what were your sons’ most memorable wildlife encounters?

I think for Luke it was seeing a sloth in Costa Rica, but only because it so closely resembled his older brother!

Many of your trips have been as a family, but you have also travelled just with your oldest son. Tell us about that.

Yes, I took Dan to Brazil on a work trip when he was 15. A great age where he was old enough to get the most from it and to put up with me doing some hotel inspections, but young enough still to want to go on holiday with his dad. We did Rio in a couple of days, making time to see the key sites, and then we headed for Manaus in the heart of the Amazon. Taking a river boat cruise into the smaller tributaries gave us amazing encounters with everything from tarantulas to pink river dolphins, and monkeys to piranhas. Then we went deeper into the jungle to a floating lodge in the Mamiraua reserve in search of the elusive uakari. It’s a white-coated monkey with a bald bright-red face. I’m pleased to say we saw several. It was a wonderful time and fabulous to have Dan there to share it with me.

 

“Travel has given them more than just a great thrill… it has given them a broader field of reference for life”

How do you think the travel experience has impacted on your sons? 

Travel has given them more than just a great thrill and experience. It has given them a broader field of reference for life that can only be a positive thing in understanding the world and their place in it. When you see how other people live and what the wild places on earth are really like then you appreciate the society and privileges we have here, and have a greater understanding of global concepts like conservation and the destruction of biodiversity. 

And how did travelling with your sons impact you?

For me, having already gained that wide field of reference from an unbelievable amount of travel in my life, the impact has been less profound. But the best thing about it has simply been the fun – the joy of spending quality time with the people I love most in the world.

 

Up, up and away

Up, up and away

Up, up and away…

Once the long-haul flight to your destination is over there are still plenty of opportunities to take to the air on your holiday….

“Arriving at a safari lodge in a tiny plane is magical.”

Small aircraft, big adventure

When I had my first safari experience – a fabulous Tribes trip to Tanzania  in 2013 – I was nervous about two things: 1) seeing creatures killed by predators and 2) all the flying involved…

By a happy twist of fate, in spite of some incredible wildlife viewing, all the animals I saw over that two-week period remained unharmed, though there was plenty of evidence of the ones who had been less fortunate; usually as scattered bones and once, memorably, in the form of the hollowed-out shell of a giraffe torso, fur still intact and looking rather like something you might find in a contemporary art gallery.

The flying, however, I couldn’t avoid. I got through the flights from the UK with my normal coping mechanism of eating everything I was offered and burying myself in books. But the small planes still loomed – it’s simply not possible to make effective use of your time on safari without hopping around in light aircraft and I was dreading it. But here’s the thing – I loved it! Me, Mrs Nervous Passenger, was delighted by the experience.

Sometimes my travelling companion and I were the only passengers in craft the size of a Mini with wings, which gave us the chance to chat away to the pilot and hear their (usually fascinating) life story. On other occasions we flew in slightly larger machines with 10 or 12 fellow passengers. And in all instances the low height and slow speed at which we travelled meant that we got a truly wonderful view of the terrain over which we flew – and when we flew over incredibly clear, turquoise water dotted with golden sand islands, it was just unforgettable.

Arriving at a safari lodge in a tiny plane is magical, particularly if you spot elephants or a large herd of zebras from the air. Then the plane gently bumps along a grass landing strip and you’re met by a friendly face from the safari lodge – sometimes with a welcoming drink!

On that very first safari trip I was longing to see elephants. As we landed on my first-ever small craft flight, at my first-ever safari camp, there was a young male elephant standing on the end of the runway. It doesn’t get much better than that. And yes, I did cry!

 

 

The silent stunner

There is something almost other-worldly about travelling in a hot air balloon. Yes, if you’re taking a morning flight you may have to get up at silly o’clock and, as you pull your clothes on and gaze around with bleary eyes, you do wonder if this was such a good idea, particularly if it’s a bit chilly.

But then the excitement starts to kick in as you get to the departure site as the pink sky of dawn starts to lighten, and you watch the balloon being inflated before you are helped into the basket, the burners make that distinctive ‘whooshing’ sound and up you go…

 

And suddenly there you are – sailing silently above the Serengeti, drifting over the 2,230 temples and pagodas of Bagan , or gazing down into walled compounds and fortresses in Jaipur, almost as transfixed by the shadow your balloon casts on the ground as you are by the views.

You see things in a way that’s not possible from a plane, as you fly so silently and slowly that the people and animals below, going about their daily lives, are completely unaware of their audience above. Was that early start worth it? Oh yes, absolutely!

 

“This is a great way to travel!”

Cable cars

OK, so you’re not flying in the strictest sense, but you’re still sailing above the ground, enjoying remarkable views and seeing things in a new way. Whether it’s the Table Mountain cable car in Cape Town, the Santiago cable car in Chile or the Sugar Loaf mountain cable car in Rio, this is a great way to travel! You can even take a 20-minute cable car ride to the iconic Kuélap walled Chachapoya fortress in Peru.

 

Ziplines

Strapped safely into a harness, you ‘fly’ along, above rainforest or through cloudforest, at one with your environment. You do whizz along and it’s exhilarating. You’re unlikely to take many photos unless you have a Go-Pro strapped to you but, for a while, you know what it feels like to take flight!

Costa Rica is a fabulous place for ziplining, with tours varying from one to even three hours, sometimes combined with Tarzan swings and hanging bridges. If this appeals, our Active Costa Rica trip could be right up your street!

Sky bike

Mashpi Lodge in Ecuador offers some wonderful ways to leave the earth beneath you. This stylish cloud forest lodge is set on a high plateau so you’re already above the clouds! From the lodge you can explore the cloud forest from the two-person sky bike – one of you pedals  alog the 200m route over a gorge while the other gets to sit back and enjoy the views. Mashpi’s Dragonfly open-air cablecar takes you on a 40-minute, 2km journey below and through the rain forest canopy at 50m per minute, and the on-board guide can stop it whenever you want to get a longer look at something; fantastic!

In Praise of Forests

In Praise of Forests

In Praise of Forests

Visiting a forest is a life-enhancing thing to do. Who can forget that moment when Lucy steps out of the coat-filled wardrobe and into the snow-covered forest of Narnia? Happily you don’t have to travel to Narnia to experience the exotic or the unknown of the forest world. From the dense, luxuriant, hot and humid rainforests of the Amazon, the ebony groves of Zambia and the bamboo, oak and magnolia forest of India’s Singalila National Park to the misty cloud forests of Costa Rica, there is an incredible wealth and diversity of forest to explore. It’s an arboreal adventure just waiting to be taken, and we would love to take you there!

“Forests are the most biologically-diverse ecosystems on land.” (United Nations)

This Thursday, March 21, is the UN International Day of Forests. A forest is a beautiful thing, of course, but it’s so much more than that. Forests cover one third of the world’s land mass and, according to the UN, “Some 1.6 billion people – including more than 2,000 indigenous cultures – depend on forests for their livelihoods, medicines, fuel, food and shelter. Forests are the most biologically-diverse ecosystems on land, home to more than 80% of the terrestrial species of animals, plants and insects.” 

What most of us would think of as ‘classic’ rainforest can be found in the Amazon in Ecuador, Brazil, Bolivia, Peru and Costa Rica. On a trip such as our Costa Rica Wildlife holiday you’d experience everything from lowland wetland rainforest, highland rainforest and cloud forest to the dense rainforests of the Osa Peninsular.

Madidi National Park in Bolivia boasts an incredibly variety of flora and fauna, its rainforest home to over 340 species of tropical birds, and 4,000 species of plants as well as to jaguars, tapirs, capybaras, ocelots, spider monkeys, howler monkeys and caimans.

The rainforest of Peru’s untouched Tambopata National Reserve, with its macaw and parrot-crammed clay licks and its giant trees and fabulous birdlife is the perfect place for a photo tour, while in a lodge such as Mashpi in Ecuador you can get an incredible bird’s-eye view of the cloud forest, both from the luxurious lodge itself and from the dragonfly cable car and the skybike.

An Amazon river cruise on board a lovely riverboat such as the Tucano is a wonderful way to get into the heart of Brazil’s rainforest, spending a week exploring some 200 miles of the Negro River, heading out in small motor launches and exploring the forest on foot. Alternatively a floating lodge such as Uakari is the ultimate get-away-from-it-all-in-the-Amazon! Here you would see the endemic red-faced Uakari monkey and in the wet season, paddle through the flooded rainforest in canoes, seeing the plantlife and wildlife at very close quarters.

Madagascar has a remarkable variety and abundance of forests.  The dry deciduous Kirindy Forest is home to the fosa, Madagascar’s largest carnivore and predator, and is not far from the world-famous Avenue of Baobabs at Morondava.  The unique spiny forest of Ifaty has amazing baobab trees, one of which is believed to be 1,500 years old, and the indigenous forest in Madagascar’s Ranomafana National Park is home to 12 species of lemur, including the critically endangered golden bamboo lemur, which was discovered there in the 1980s.

“In Costa Rica you can experience everything from lowland wetland and highland rainforest to cloud forest.”

The 25,000-year-old Bwindi Impenetrable Forest in Uganda is glorious, not least because it’s home to about half the world’s population of mountain gorillas. It is actually penetrable(!) and, in addition to the magical experience of seeing gorillas in their natural habitat, visitors can see an incredible wealth of birdlife and butterflies, while the national park in which the forest is located is home to 120 species of mammals, including 11 primate species.

The ebony groves of South Luangwa National Park, Zambia, are something very special. The park is one of the finest wildlife sanctuaries in Africa, so game viewing is amazing, and the ebony trees are quite beautiful. Visit in the dry season and they are glorious, visit in what’s called ‘the Emerald Season’ – the rainy season – and you can experience the flooded ebony groves, the tree trunks emerging from several feet of water. It’s an almost primeval experience to make your way amongst them in a canoe.

While not strictly forming a forest, the baobabs in Ruaha in Tanzania are unforgettably impressive trees, as Tribes’ director Amanda Marks felt moved to pay tribute to last year. The acacia-covered savannah lands of Serengeti – again not forest, but gloriously tree-filled – are also stunning, and a trip that combines these with Ruaha is a great option.

The forests of Singalila National Park in India are home to the endangered red panda, as well as the black panther, Himalayan black bear and clouded leopard. And, for the ultimate forest getaway, there’s the Tree House Hideaway in an area of private jungle on the edge of Bandhavgarh National Park, which is home of a healthy population of tigers. The deluxe rooms are set in large trees, so you couldn’t get any closer to the heart of the forest!

Future forests

For each booking made with us we plant trees via our Travel Forest, which is part of the Tribes Foundation, the charity we back with admin and funds. We are proud to say that, as of 2018, we have planted over 50,000 saplings in Africa and Peru.